Saturday, February 16, 2013

I figure the best way for you to become familiar with the project is to see it in picture form. I will post a plan of it soon, but these pictures really convey the information better than I ever could by writing it down.

If you remember the first Morningside apartment post, then you’ll remember that this is an apartment that needs some new life breathed into it. Here you can see why. Years of being a rental, neglect and previous remodels have taken their toll on the space. 

Through all of the muck and the grime, we were able to come up with a new floorplan and finish schedule that really honored the age of the apartment while bringing it forward to the new century. 

Morningside has some good bones, and items that we definitely wanted to keep to incorporate into the finished space. The original woodwork, doors and transoms were the focus of our recovery efforts. We couldn’t save the floors, which these pictures don’t quite convey how rough of shape they were in. These aren’t the original wood floors, these were probably added sometime in the 40s to “modernize” the apartment. The original wood floors are two layers below this parquet. 

The bathroom will keep the same footprint, but is a complete gut remodel and is already down to the studs. In there we found the original tin ceilings and the original tile work (under 4 layers of different coverings). Both of these were severely damaged and the money it would take to bring them back far outweighed the budget. We did, however, photograph and pull inspiration to help guide us in providing the new finishes.

The bedrooms are both remaining relatively the same size, but will be upgraded with new walls, electrical and cable, and be given new closets to replace the particle board closets, most likely put in during an 80s kitchen remodel. 

The kitchen will receive the biggest change. We’re extending it out from the small nook to wrap around the wall to the left (the wall with the electrical panel). From there it will receive new cabinetry, appliances (including a dishwasher) and countertops. The kitchen will be fairly unrecognizable from this current iteration of 80s raised oak panel cabinets and white and blue ceramic tile.

Bada bing, bada boom. Next post will focus on the floorplan and some of the materials pulled in for the kitchen and bathroom.

Wednesday, February 6, 2013
The Morningside apartment began this past week. Well…it actually started a while ago, however I waited to put anything about it online. Some projects I work on really grip me and I become very invested. It doesn’t have to do with the budget, it doesn’t have to do with the scope, it’s a feeling. 
Just a little bit about the renovation so that you’re up to speed. This is a small two bedroom apartment in the Morningside Heights neighborhood in Manhattan. Now…since I moved here in 2011 I haven’t ventured further north than 110th…and even then, that was only last November. 
The neighborhood is next to Columbia and the neighborhood has a very different vibe than most I encounter in Manhattan. Very hip, very young and very…college town-esque? I don’t know how to describe it. Anyway, I’m not describing the neighborhood…you can read more about it on Wikipedia, if you really want.
The Apartment
Built in 1914, this apartment is OLD. The oldest I’ve really worked on to date. Not the oldest building, you may remember the loft project from last year (no? check out my portfolio to get a feel) but THIS apartment hasn’t had any past lives than as a two bedroom apartment. It’s always had the same foot print and hasn’t had any past incarnations. 
It hasn’t been untouched. Years of changes, trends and updates have been made…some good, most bad. Bad enough that this guy needed a gut remodel. When we got a hold of it, I was surprised to see what did remain…original woodwork, soaring ceilings and fantastic hardware immediately stood out, and then was trumped by the dated kitchen, 70s lighting and 80s bathroom…
We couldn’t work around it all, so we went in with a plan..and hammers swinging. Plans include:
New and extended kitchen
Updated appliances, cabinetry, and layout
New Walls
New Floors (now…I LOVE old wood floors, and believe me, if these were salvageable ..I would’ve been first in line. However the beautiful [I’m assuming] original floors were covered in parquet, then vinyl, then carpeting…too much to strip down. Don’t talk to me about it, I’m depressed, still.)
New Walls
New Bathroom
New Electric, data and phone lines
New Ceiling
New lighting plan
Basically, if you can think it, we are doing it.
Now…I have a love/hate relationship walking into old buildings that have no allusions to their past. We fought, and won, to keep the original red oak woodwork, that miraculously hasn’t been painted in 100 years. Who am I to rip that out? It’s a fighter, and so am I. We also kept the original doors, transoms and other vintage details.
The “Feeling”
Some places I walk into and get that feeling. I can’t and won’t ever be able to write it out, but I’ll try. I come from the West (Wyoming, represent!) and while we have some old buildings they pale in comparison, numbers, grandeur and just about everything to the buildings out here in NYC. These buildings have seen history…people have lived out their lives in them…and I never take that for granted. It hit me with this apartment, maybe because it hasn’t ever been anything other than this? It’s always been a single family residence…and there was just a connection there. It has good energy, light, space, and, even though I love all my projects, this one has been neglected and run down through the years…I’m happy to be the person to breathe new life into it for, hopefully, another 100 years of life.

Ramble, ramble. That’s it! Follow along! I’ll tag all of these as “Morningside” for quick reference…for now.

*The picture is of the 125th street bridge for the 1,2,3 Lines. Which is literally right out of the door. Amazing. I could dedicate an entire post to things like this, but I won’t.

The Morningside apartment began this past week. Well…it actually started a while ago, however I waited to put anything about it online. Some projects I work on really grip me and I become very invested. It doesn’t have to do with the budget, it doesn’t have to do with the scope, it’s a feeling. 

Just a little bit about the renovation so that you’re up to speed. This is a small two bedroom apartment in the Morningside Heights neighborhood in Manhattan. Now…since I moved here in 2011 I haven’t ventured further north than 110th…and even then, that was only last November. 

The neighborhood is next to Columbia and the neighborhood has a very different vibe than most I encounter in Manhattan. Very hip, very young and very…college town-esque? I don’t know how to describe it. Anyway, I’m not describing the neighborhood…you can read more about it on Wikipedia, if you really want.

The Apartment

Built in 1914, this apartment is OLD. The oldest I’ve really worked on to date. Not the oldest building, you may remember the loft project from last year (no? check out my portfolio to get a feel) but THIS apartment hasn’t had any past lives than as a two bedroom apartment. It’s always had the same foot print and hasn’t had any past incarnations. 

It hasn’t been untouched. Years of changes, trends and updates have been made…some good, most bad. Bad enough that this guy needed a gut remodel. When we got a hold of it, I was surprised to see what did remain…original woodwork, soaring ceilings and fantastic hardware immediately stood out, and then was trumped by the dated kitchen, 70s lighting and 80s bathroom…

We couldn’t work around it all, so we went in with a plan..and hammers swinging. Plans include:

  • New and extended kitchen
  • Updated appliances, cabinetry, and layout
  • New Walls
  • New Floors (now…I LOVE old wood floors, and believe me, if these were salvageable ..I would’ve been first in line. However the beautiful [I’m assuming] original floors were covered in parquet, then vinyl, then carpeting…too much to strip down. Don’t talk to me about it, I’m depressed, still.)
  • New Walls
  • New Bathroom
  • New Electric, data and phone lines
  • New Ceiling
  • New lighting plan
  • Basically, if you can think it, we are doing it.

Now…I have a love/hate relationship walking into old buildings that have no allusions to their past. We fought, and won, to keep the original red oak woodwork, that miraculously hasn’t been painted in 100 years. Who am I to rip that out? It’s a fighter, and so am I. We also kept the original doors, transoms and other vintage details.

The “Feeling”

Some places I walk into and get that feeling. I can’t and won’t ever be able to write it out, but I’ll try. I come from the West (Wyoming, represent!) and while we have some old buildings they pale in comparison, numbers, grandeur and just about everything to the buildings out here in NYC. These buildings have seen history…people have lived out their lives in them…and I never take that for granted. It hit me with this apartment, maybe because it hasn’t ever been anything other than this? It’s always been a single family residence…and there was just a connection there. It has good energy, light, space, and, even though I love all my projects, this one has been neglected and run down through the years…I’m happy to be the person to breathe new life into it for, hopefully, another 100 years of life.

Ramble, ramble. That’s it! Follow along! I’ll tag all of these as “Morningside” for quick reference…for now.

*The picture is of the 125th street bridge for the 1,2,3 Lines. Which is literally right out of the door. Amazing. I could dedicate an entire post to things like this, but I won’t.

Tuesday, November 13, 2012

It’s been a while, my apologies. I’m currently compiling a post about my FAVORITE architectural and design detail, but I need the best images to portray them. It’s taking me much longer than anticipated.

However, here’s a nice piece on the interim.

I have been working on many bathrooms in the last couple of weeks, and it’s really had me delving into unique and beautiful pieces to incorporate. Through all of this, I’ve been able to compile my favorite pieces for a bathroom I would want.

While I will always love beautiful, clean, simple, white bathrooms, I have a soft spot for dark, moody, masculine bathrooms. Many clients I encounter think that going dark in the bathroom makes it feel dirty or dingy. I think that the combination of dark woods, geometric wallpaper, dark stones, interesting patterned tiled, along with *swoons* brass fixtures makes a bathroom elegant and timeless.

Above:

  • Vanity - Jeton Collection Vanity by Bill Sofield for Kallista — $5211
  • Faucet - R.W. Atlas Collection by Roman and Williams for Waterworks 
  • Vanity Lights - Ava Bath Light by Alexa Hampton for Circa Lighting — $294
  • Shower Exposed Thermostatic Contron - R.W. Atlas Collection by Roman and Williams for Waterworks
  • Wall Mounted Toilet - Vintage Wall Mounted Toilet for Hastings — $530
  • Wall Tile - GEL Beadboard Ceramic Tile, Chair and Baseboard by Hastings 
  • Floor Field - 6x24 Petrified Wood Herringbone by Hastings — $12 sq.ft. 
  • Shower Accent Tile - Circulos by Cement Tile Shop — $14.50 sq.ft. 
  • Wallpaper - Aronel Vivid-Cream Wallpaper by Walnut Wallpaper — $69/roll



Friday, August 31, 2012
detailsorientedbyshapepluspace:

Inventor’s Paradise: The Brain by Olson Kundig Architects

detailsorientedbyshapepluspace:

Inventor’s Paradise: The Brain by Olson Kundig Architects

(Source: downeastandout)

theoccultcollective:

Prospect Heights Residence, Workstead

theoccultcollective:

Prospect Heights Residence, Workstead

atavus:

Thomas Doyle - Distillation

OBSESSED WITH THESE.

arkitekcher:

Aquino House / Augusto Fernández Mas (K+A Diseño)

Location: Cuernavacas, Morelos, Mexico